Tag Archives: Related projects

Following the IASSRT symposium, we are publishing a series of posts showcasing the papers most relevant to the Nara to Norwich project. This abstract is by Orit Shamir and her colleagues, on silk fragments from south and east found in the eastern Mediterranean.

Following the IASSRT symposium, we are publishing a series of posts showcasing the papers most relevant to the Nara to Norwich project. This paper, by Hero Granger-Taylor, considers the hypotheses about in what form the Romans acquired silk.

Following the IASSRT symposium, we are publishing a series of posts showcasing the papers most relevant to the Nara to Norwich project. This paper, by Hiroya Himeka, is on Silk Road textiles in Japan and was translated by Melissa M. Rinne.

Following the IASSRT symposium, we are publishing a series of posts showcasing the papers most relevant to the Nara to Norwich project. This paper, by Oyama Yuzuruha, is on Silk Road textiles in Japan and was part of a panel organised and chaired by Melissa M. Rinne.

In this post, Prof. Susan Whitfield introduces us to the 7th annual meeting of IASSRT which was held in the UK for the first time in October 2023. This conference provided an opportunity to extend the group’s horizons to the northwest edges of the Silk Roads.

In this post, Professor Neil Price tells us about an exciting new project to establish a Centre of Excellence at Uppsala, to focus on The World in the Viking Age.

Before the arrival of Christianity, with its assimilation of previous beliefs and festivals, the period we now call Christmas, around the mid-winter solstice, was also an important annual event for people of many cultures and times. We can see from archaeology how deep this marking of the close of one year and beginning of the next goes back into the past.

August and September 2022 saw the second season of archaeological excavation on the site of the East Anglian royal settlement at Rendlesham in Suffolk. In this blog post, Professor Christopher Scull talks about the Rendlesham Revealed project.

During the first nine months, even during COVID restrictions on group events, the exhibition entitled: “The Buddhist Maritime Silk Road” has attracted 600,000 in-person visitors.

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