Tag Archives: N2N Team

In this post, Prof. Susan Whitfield introduces us to the 7th annual meeting of IASSRT which was held in the UK for the first time in October 2023. This conference provided an opportunity to extend the group’s horizons to the northwest edges of the Silk Roads.

The Later Prehistoric Norfolk Project examines the similarities and differences between the extremities of Eurasia in prehistory and proto-history. In this post, Andy Hutcheson describes the excavations that took place at Warham Camp in July 2023 as part of The Later Prehistoric Norfolk Project.

A reflection on the workshop hosted by colleagues in the Department of History and Asian Studies Centre, Boğaziçi University in Istanbul, in collaboration with SISJAC and funded by Toshiba International Foundation in spring 2023.

Each new year is associated with an animal in a 12-year cycle which is found across the eastern Silk Roads and 2023 is the year of the hare or rabbit. This recalls a design which is found across the Silk Roads in Buddhist, Christian and Islamic contexts, the so-called ‘Three Hares’.

Before the arrival of Christianity, with its assimilation of previous beliefs and festivals, the period we now call Christmas, around the mid-winter solstice, was also an important annual event for people of many cultures and times. We can see from archaeology how deep this marking of the close of one year and beginning of the next goes back into the past.

Nestling in the foothills at the southern end of the Nara basin in Japan is the village of Asuka. This region, full of ancient tombs and temples, is the focus of the Japan chapter of our Nara to Norwich story.

The cross is the pre-eminent Christian symbol, depicting the execution of Christ in a brutal method reserved by the Roman State as a deterrent for offensive crimes.

In June 2022, the Nara to Norwich team travelled to Sweden to view some of the archaeological sites and items explored in the exhibition.

Welcome to our inaugural blog, posted at the launch of our online exhibition, ‘Nara to Norwich: Arts and Beliefs at the Ends of the Silk Roads.’

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